Items filtered by date: June 2015 - Africa First

These secondary school students taught themselves to code and, with encouragement from their parents and school, they’ve achieved something extraordinary.

Anesi and Osine Ikhianosime, 13 and 15 years old respectively, are students of Greensprings school, Anthony Campus, Lagos, and they developed an Android based web browser called Crocodile Browser Lite sometime last year.

Osine’s interest in computers began at the tender age of 7, the same age which he and his brother –who was 9 at the time (born June 1, 1999), decided to start a company of their own. Inspired by Microsoft’s “Windows” platform, they initially named their new company ‘Doors’, but later changed the name to ‘BluDoors’ when they found out that the initial name had been taken.

The two brothers decided to learn to code at ages 12 and 14 respectively. “I learnt to code by myself. I started in 2013, I used sites sites like Code Academy, Code Avengers and books like ‘Android for Game Development’ and ‘Games for Dummies’,” said Anesi.

According to both brothers, they started developing an Android based web browser, which they named Crocodile Browser Lite, about a year ago, out of boredom. Their strong interest in technology, coupled with their desire to learn, informed the decision to create a functional, fast browser for low end feature phones because “We were fed up with Google Chrome”, according to them.

The brothers launched their browser on the Mobango app before taking it onto the Google Play Store so they could reach a wider audience. Their browser currently has around 500 downloads, but no ads yet.

Their mother, Mrs. Ngozi Ikhianosime, a Math teacher, said, “Oseni could already use a PC before could read, at age 3.” She also said that the school the boys attended also played a key role in encouraging their love for coding. They had access to computers in school and they both had personal laptops at home.

Source: pctechmag.com

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Africa Together, run by the University’s African Society, hosted a range of speakers at the Cambridge Union for a programme which promised to reimagine Africa. Business in Africa Conference: Sustainable Growth in Times of Uncertainty, held at the Judge Business School, looked at how Africa was no longer just a land of opportunity, but a region full of success stories.

Speaking at Africa Together, Nungari Mwangi, President of the African Society noted that The African Union has declared 2015 to be the year of women’s empowerment and the content of the event’s programme reflected that. Keynote speaker Madame Bineta Diop, Special Envoy for Women, Peace and Security, African Union, said in her opening remarks: “Women have been the backbone of African society. When you go into the fields you see that women are the ones that support the family, the community. But their work is not accounted for in measurements of GDP.”

Following her speech the first session tackled Women and Leadership and further sessions touched on entrepreneurship, the media’s perception of the continent, education and heritage. The audience also heard a poem by St John’s College student Justina Kehinde, which highlighted female African heroes. Dr Pauline Essah, Manager of the University’s Cambridge-Africa Programme, was part of a panel session looking at African Education Systems. The Cambridge-Africa Programme is a key element in the University of Cambridge’s international strategy and covers several initiatives.

Key note speaker Lord Michael Hastings, of KPMG, said that challenges remain for businesses in Africa, not least infrastructure issues like electricity supplies, but he added that a recent poll showed that in some countries confidence in the future was higher than it had been for a generation.

Source: www.cam.ac.uk/news

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A Nigerian student has broken a 30-year-old maths equation and achieved the highest grades at a university in Japan for 50 years.

Ufot Ekong, who studied at Tokai University in Tokyo, achieved a first class degree in electrical engineering and scored the best marks at the university since 1965, the Flotilla Magazine reported.

He began his success early at the university, solving a 30-year-old maths equation in his first semester.

Throughout his university career Mr Ekong has won six awards for academic excellence. The brilliant mathematician worked two jobs alongside his studies to pay his way as a student.

Mr Ekong also speaks English, French, Japanese and Yoruba and won a Japanese language award for foreigners. He is currently working for Nissan and already has two patents for electronic car design to his name.

Tokai University is a prestigious private university based in the Japanese capital, which was founded in 1924. It is focused on the sciences and technology and roughly 60 per cent of all students are enrolled in these schools.

Source: independent.co.uk

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These secondary school students taught themselves to code and, with encouragement from their parents and school, they’ve achieved something extraordinary. Anesi and Osine Ikhianosime, 13 and 15 years old respectively, are students of Greensprings...